Data journalism

This category contains 58 posts

Want to build a VR network chart? Here’s a way to do it without coding

Making a virtual reality visual is traditionally a tricky thing, as we found out in building one around Brexit. It requires coding and developers and there are many rules about avoiding making people feel physically sick. That’s a barrier to use. But recently, a new platform has made it a lot easier to visualise data … Continue reading

Can data journalism be taught?

There’s no shortage of advice on teaching journalism students. If you believe what you read, young reporters need to learn to code; not to learn to code; learn history of the internet (the flowchart above is from there), or the ‘technologies of the web‘. The fact that there’s so much discussion is easy to understand: it’s the traditional curse of … Continue reading

Visual journalism gallery: images from the world’s best newsrooms and designers

Journalism hasn’t been ‘just’ words for some time — and there’s a phrase for one strand: ‘Visual Journalism’. I’ve written one of the pieces in a new book from Gestalten which provides a detailed (and beautiful) look at the field, combining images and text. But the real stars are the visuals. Here’s a selection. Visual Journalism on Amazon

A new machine learning app for reporting on hate in America

Hate crimes in America have historically been difficult to track since there is very little official data collected. What data does exist is incomplete and not very useful for reporters keen to learn more. This led ProPublica — with the support of the Google News Lab — to form Documenting Hate earlier this year, acollaborative reporting project that aims to create a national … Continue reading

Data needs empathy to make it real

The latest in our series of data visualisation projects sees Shirley Wu and Nadieh Bremer apply their unique take on life to Google data. The pair together make up Datasketch.es. Shirley is based in San Francisco, Nadieh in Amsterdam, and the two regularly produce complementary work that tells beautiful stories. This month, in the latest … Continue reading

Open data is a right

It’s not that long ago that open data was set to change the world. Governments across the globe opened their vast vaults of data. By mid-2010, it looked like the river of data was unstoppable. First the US launch of data.gov, then data.gov.uk — and then a “tsunami” of open data around the globe, from Bahrain … Continue reading

Documenting Hate: gathering data where there is none

Data journalism has to do one important thing to prove its worth: it has to matter.  And providing data where there is none is a key part of that role. This is where Documenting Hate comes in. The project, which includes a number of different news organisations and journalists, is designed to change that by collecting, … Continue reading

US election 2016: How to download county-level results data

If open data means anything, it applies to elections. But yet here we are, a week after the results, and open data around the results is hard to find. It matters because having that data allows us to understand the results better, and what they say about America today. It also means that the data can … Continue reading

Electionland: the most important data journalism project this year

While America goes to the polls, a group of data journalists, fact-checkers, reporters and social media experts gather in a room at CUNY in New York. The purpose: to monitor in real-time voting issues around the country. It’s a huge project – you can see some of the results as they happen here. I’m also … Continue reading

How is the world searching for the US Presidential Election? A Data Visualisation from the Google News Lab.

The US Presidential election is not just being watched in America. From Indiana to India, each development is being intently followed by people across the globe. Those people are also searching about the election online — and that’s whereworldpotus.com comes in. Along with Accurat, a design group headed by Gabriele Rossi, Simone Quadri and Giorgia Lupi (of … Continue reading

About me

Data journalist, writer, speaker. Author of 'Facts are Sacred', published by Faber & Faber and a new range of infographics for children books from Candlewick. Data editor at Google, California. Formerly at Twitter, San Francisco. Created the Guardian Datablog. All opinions on this site are mine, not my employers'. Read more >>

Free to share

Creative commons

Please share me around. Everything here is free to use under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License

Follow me on Twitter